Home > Switches > Port and VLAN Configuration > Configuring the MS Access Switch for Standard VoIP deployments

Configuring the MS Access Switch for Standard VoIP deployments

Standard Data/VoIP deployments commonly utilize a three port switch built in to the VoIP phone to connect a workstation and phone to the same switch port:

4869d005-f523-460f-ad98-87a9a6b05adb

 

For these deployments the MS Access Switch should be configured with Voice VLANs and QoS (Quality of Service) to separate voice traffic into its own broadcast domain and tag it for optimal transfer and prioritization. The MS Access Switch utilizes LLDP (Link Layer Discovery Protocol) to recognize the VoIP phone connected and retrieve various properties of the phone. QoS on the MS Switch tags specific traffic that is incoming on the desired switch ports and prioritizes traffic which is important for voice traffic due to its sensitivity to latency. This article describes how to configure the MS Access Switch using these features to optimize VoIP performance and minimize poor call quality:

  1. Configure the desired switch port(s) as access port(s)
  2. Configure data and voice VLANs 
  3. Configure QoS settings

Configuring Access Ports

  1. Navigate to Configure > Switch ports and choose the specific port to be modified. 
  2. Using the Type drop down, change the port to access:

Configure Data and Voice VLANs

Once the port has been changed to an access port, enter the data and voice VLANs:

Configure QoS settings

QoS settings can be enabled on dashboard under Configure > Switch Settings, in the Quality of service section:

 

This rule tells the MS Access Switch to place a class tag on the specific voice packets that enter it. See this knowledge base article for more information on QoS. This tag will follow the voice packets to other switches. Below is an example of a configured rule under the QoS section. VLAN 20 is the voice VLAN for this network:

 

These configurations ensure the switch will correctly prioritize voice traffic as it traverses the network and reduce the chance of voice data being forwarded incorrectly. 

You must to post a comment.
Last modified
10:45, 10 Jul 2017

Tags

Classifications

This page has no classifications.

Explore Meraki

You can find out more about Cisco Meraki on our main site, including information on products, contacting sales and finding a vendor.

Explore Meraki

Contact Support

Most questions can be answered by reviewing our documentation, but if you need more help, Cisco Meraki Support is ready to work with you.

Open a Case

Ask the Community

In the Meraki Community, you can keep track of the latest announcements, find answers provided by fellow Meraki users and ask questions of your own.

Visit the Community