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MR45 and MR55 Overview and Specifications

Overview

The Meraki MR45 and MR55 product lines provide exceptional wireless distribution for higher density networking environments that require flexibility and performance. These cloud-managed wireless access points allow for easy, yet granular configuration for wireless deployments, ensuring seamless integration and manageability in your network. 

Introduce Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) throughput speeds into your Wireless LAN with ease with the MR45 and MR55.  These access points provide high performance with Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) capabilities, 4 dual-band radios for 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz coverage, as well as integrated Multigigabit Ethernet ports for throughput speeds up to 5 Gbps.

mr45_55.png

Features

  • Managed via Cisco Meraki Dashboard

  • Remote Packet Capture Tools via Meraki Dashboard

  • Automatic Firmware upgrades

  • 802.11X and Active Directory integration

  • Air Marshal for wireless reporting and security

  • Stateful Layer 3-7 firewall options

  • Integrated antivirus scanning

  • Dual-concurrent radios with MU-MINO

  • Dedicated scanning radio
  • Real-time RF spectrum views

  • Cloud-based automatic RF environment optimization

  • Location analytics

  • Cisco ISE integration for guest access and BYOD posturing

  • Maximal ratio combining (MRC) and beamforming

  • Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) wireless support

  • Integrated Ethernet port with Multigigabit capabilities

Configuration

The basic initial configuration of the MR45 is just as simple as with other MR models. The links below provide additional information and instructions relating to each step in getting the device setup and configured for the first time.

  1. Claim the device to an organization on the Meraki dashboard
    1. If a dashboard organization does not yet exist, create one
  2. Add the device to a dashboard network 
    1. If a network does not yet exist, create one first
  3. Physically connect the device to the local network
    1. Connect the RJ45 ports to existing infrastructure to provide power and an uplink
    2. If necessary, configure a static IP through the local status page to allow it to communicate with the Meraki dashboard.
  4. Allow the device to completely check-in and perform any initial firmware upgrades
  5. Finish configuring the device from the Meraki dashboard 
    1. Enable SSIDs
    2. Configure SSIDs
    3. Modify Firewall rules
    4. Assign wireless profiles

Context and Comparisons

 

MR45

MR55

Multigigabit Ethernet Port

1x 1000/2.5G BASE-T Ethernet 1x 1000/2.5/5G BASE-T Ethernet

802.11AX support

Yes, 4 Stream MU-MIMO

Yes, 8 Stream MU-MIMO

External antennas

No

No

Radios

2x 2.4 GHz and 2x 5 GHz

2x 2.4 GHz and 2x 5 GHz

BLE Location Analytics

Yes

Yes

Dedicated Scanning Radio

Yes, 1x

Yes, 1x

Technical Breakdown

Hardware Breakdown

  MR45 MR55
Internal Antennas 4x Omni-directional antennas (5.4 dBi gain at 2.4 GHz, 6 dBi gain at 5 GHz) 4x Omni-directional antennas (5.4 dBi gain at 2.4 GHz, 6 dBi gain at 5 GHz)
External Antennas None None
RJ45 Ethernet Port 1x 1000/2.5G BASE-T Ethernet 1x 1000/2.5G/5G BASE-T Ethernet
12 V DC Input 1x 1x

802.11 Wireless

 

MR45

MR55

2.4 GHz Radio Information

802.11b/g/n/ax 4x4 MU-MIMO with 4 spatial streams

802.11b/g/n/ax 4x4 MU-MIMO with 4 spatial streams
5 GHz Radio Information 802.11a/n/ac/ax 4x4 MU-MIMO with 4 spatial streams 802.11a/n/ac/ax 8x8 MU-MIMO with 8 spatial streams
Maximum Data Rate

3.5 Gbps

5.9 Gbps

Maximal Ratio Combining (MRC) and Beamforming Yes Yes

Radiation Patterns

Physical

 

MR45

MR55

Mount Type

Desktop, ceiling, and wall mount capable

Desktop, ceiling, and wall mount capable

Dimensions (L x W x H)

12.05” x 5.06” x 1.74”

(30.6 cm x 12.84 cm x 4.426 cm)

12.83” x 5.54” x 1.76”

(32.6 cm x 14.8 cm x 4.47 cm)

Weigh

28.22 oz (800 g)

35.27 oz (1 kg)

Power Supply

Not included

Not Included

Power Load

18 Watt Maximum

22 Watt Maximum

Operating Temperature

32°F - 104 °F
0°C - 40 °C
32°F - 104 °F
0°C - 40 °C

Humidity

5% to 95%

5% to 95%

Accessories

Accessory

Description

MA-PWR-30W

AP wall power adapter

MA-INJ-4

Gigabit 802.3at PoE injector

MA-INJ-5

Multigigabit 802.3at PoE

Troubleshooting

Meraki MR access points use LEDs to indicate their current status.  When the devices power on, the main LED will be amber in color. Additional LED statuses are described below.

LED Status

Meaning

Solid Green

AP is communicating with the Meraki dashboard and is functioning properly

Solid Blue

AP is communicating with the Meraki dashboard and currently has clients connected

Blinking Blue

AP is applying the latest configured firmware

Cycling Colors

AP is booting and attempting to reach out to the Meraki dashboard

Amber

AP is going through initial boot up process, is having trouble communicating to the Meraki dashboard, or has a potential hardware issue

Blinking Amber

AP has determined there is a hardware fault

Common Troubleshooting

My device is connected to the network but not checking in to the Meraki cloud or shows a solid orange LED

Confirm that the device is powered on and has a valid IP address that is able to access the internet. Use the local status page to get more information about the connectivity status of the device such as if it can successfully reach the local gateway, internet, and/or Meraki cloud servers. If necessary, contact Meraki support for additional assistance.

 

My status LED is blinking BLUE

A blinking BLUE Status LED indicates that the device is in contact with the Meraki cloud servers and is performing a firmware update. This can sometimes take 20-45 minutes or more to complete depending on hardware and other factors.

 

My status LED is blinking ORANGE

The device is not able to successfully communicate with the Dashboard Cloud servers or there may be a hardware issue with the device. Check the local status page of the device to confirm the status. If necessary, contact Meraki support for additional assistance.

Event Log

The most common event log messages and their meanings are listed in the Common Wireless Event Log Messages guide.

Common Wireless Alerts

802.1X authentication failure

Indication that the access point was not able to appropriately communicate with the configured RADIUS server and thus is unable to authenticate clients on an SSID that requires users to authenticate via RADIUS credentials.

DFS Event

When the access point detects a radar signal on the same channel it is broadcasting on with its 5 GHz radio, the access point will then take action so it will not interfere with the radar single. There are several steps the AP will take when a DFS event takes place.  First, all new transmissions on the channel will be blocked, followed by a broadcast of an 802.11h channel-switch announcement. The access point will then disassociate all remaining clients, and then select a new 5 GHz channel to broadcast on.

FAQ

Are MR45 & MR55 compliant with the Wi-Fi 6/802.11ax standard?

As of April 29th, 2019 the 802.11ax standard has not been fully ratified. This is expected to be completed at the end of 2019. MR45 and MR55 comply with a majority of features that are part of the 802.11ax standard and end-users can immediately recognize all of the benefits related to these features.

 

Does Meraki have Wi-Fi 6 APs with external antennas? Are those on the roadmap?

MR45 and MR55 do not come with external antennas. The new Wi-Fi 6 standard does enable up to a maximum 4x increase in speeds at the cell boundary. Meraki does intend to build Wi-Fi 6 APs with external antennas, but as of April 29th, 2019 we have not announced anything to the public.

 

Do MR45 & MR55 have UL-MIMO and UL-OFDMA?

Today, MR45 and MR55 support DL-MIMO, and DL-OFDMA, not UL-MIMO and UL-OFDMA. Meraki has observed that a majority of bandwidth in wireless networks is downlink traffic, and a majority of the impact on aggregate throughputs comes from downlink traffic.

 

How will Meraki’s new MR45/55 work with existing legacy Wi-Fi networks?

MR45/55 are backward compatible and will work with legacy devices. Additionally, there are very few Wi-Fi 6 capable devices available in the market and hence a majority of the traffic seen on the APs will be from legacy devices.

 

What is the benefit of Wi-Fi 6 AP’s if there are no Wi-Fi 6 clients on the network?

With the MR55 you now have an 8x8 access point that enables more streams to the

client. This will enable better access point range and enable more spatial diversity which enables better MU-MIMO performance. Additionally, legacy Wi-Fi clients will benefit from the new 4x4 2.4 GHz radio, this doubles the number of spatial streams available to clients in this band for both the MR45 and MR55. As of early 2019, there have already been several Wi-Fi 6 clients released, and more are expected through 2019 & 2020. 

 

What improved performance can I expect on my network?

Wi-Fi 6 introduces a host of new features that can help improve range, aggregate throughput, power savings, and more. Features such as OFDMA, MU-MIMO, 1024 QAM, BSS coloring all work to provide the next generation of Wi-Fi, targeted at the modern world of high-density client counts, and throughputs. The exact improved performance will depend on the particular nature of the network.

 

Is an mGig switch required for MR45/55?

It is not required for the network, but MR45 and MR55 will have mGig support. Whether the switches are needed depends on the specific network and the bandwidth that traverses the AP. As more Wi-Fi 6 clients become available, it is likely that you will need mGig support.

 

How does Wi-Fi 6 work or compete with 5G?

Wi-Fi 6 and 5G networks are expected to work together. In fact, several Wi-Fi 6 technologies, including OFDMA are analogous to cellular LTE technologies. We expect that Wi-Fi 6 will continue to be the dominant access technology indoors, while 5G will see increased use in outdoor environments. Wi-Fi 6 and 5G are expected to have more seamless transitions between the two technologies. When higher speed 4G was introduced, Wi-Fi offloading increased, and 5G is expected to have a similar impact. According to the Cisco 2019 VNI, 71% of 5G traffic is expected to be offloaded to Wi-Fi or small-cell.

Compliance and Standards

IEEE Standards
802.11a
802.11ac
802.11ax Compatible
802.11b
802.11e
802.11g
802.11h
802.11i
802.11k
802.11n
802.11r
802.11u and Hotspot 2.0
Safety Approvals
CSA and CB 60950 & 62368
Conforms to UL 2043 (Plenum Rating)

 

Radio Approvals
Canada: FCC Part 15C, 15E, RSS-247
Europe: EN 300 328, EN 301 893
Australia/NZ: AS/NZS 4268
Mexico: IFT, NOM-208
Taiwan: NCC LP0002
For additional country-specific regulatory information, please contact Meraki Sales
EMI Approvals (Class B)
Canada: FCC Part 15B, ICES-003
Europe: EN 301 489-1-17, EN 55032, EN 55024
Australia/NZ: CISPR 22
Japan: VCCI
Exposure Approvals
Canada: FCC Part 2, RSS-102
Europe: EN 50385, EN 62311, EN 62479
Australia/NZ: AS/NZS 2772

Tx/Rx Tables | 2.4 GHz

Operating Band

Operating Mode

Data Rate

TX Power (conducted)

RX Sensitivity

2.4 GHz

802.11b

1 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-99 dbm

2 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-94 dBm

5.5 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-94 dBm

11 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-90 dBm

2.4 GHz

802.11g

6 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-94 dBm

9 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-93 dBm

12 Mb/s

24.0 dBm

-90 dBm

18 Mb/s

24.0 dBm

-89 dBm

24 Mb/s

23.0 dBm

-86 dBm

36 Mb/s

23.0 dBm

-83 dBm

48 Mb/s

22.0 dBm

-78 dBm

54 Mb/s

22.0 dBm

-77 dBm

2.4 GHz

802.11n

(HT20)

MCS0

26.0 dBm

-95 dBm

MCS1

26.0 dBm

-92 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-90 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-87 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-84 dBm

MCS5

22.0 dBm

-80 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-70 dBm

MCS7

21.0 dBm

-77 dBm

2.4 GHz

802.11ac

(VHT20)

MCS0

26.0 dBm

-95 dBm

MCS1

26.0 dBm

-92 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-90 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-87 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-84 dBm

MCS5

22.0 dBm

-80 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-79 dBm

MCS7

21.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS8

20.0 dBm

-73 dBm

2.4 GHz

802.11ax

(HE20)

MCS0

26.0 dBm

-95 dBm

MCS1

26.0 dBm

-93 dBm

MCS2

26.0 dBm

-91 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-88 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS5

24.0 dBm

-81 dBm

MCS6

23.0 dBm

-79 dBm

MCS7

22.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS8

21.0 dBm

-74 dBm

MCS9

20.0 dBm

-72 dBm

MCS10

19.0 dBm

-68 dBm

MCS11

19.0 dBm

-66 dBm

2.4 GHz

802.11ac

(VHT40)

MCS0

24.0 dBm

-92 dBm

MCS1

24.0 dBm

-89 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-87 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-84 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-81 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-76 dBm

MCS7

23.0 dBm

-74 dBm

MCS8

20.5 dBm

-71 dBm

MCS9

20.0

-69 dBm

2.4 GHz

802.11ax

(HE40)

MCS0

24.0 dBm

-92 dBm

MCS1

24.0 dBm

-91 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-88 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-82 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-78 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-79 dBm

MCS7

21.5 dBm

-75 dBm

MCS8

20.5 dBm

-71 dBm

MCS9

20.0 dBm

-69 dBm

MCS10

18.5 dBm

-65 dBm

MCS11

18.5 dBm

-63 dBm

Tx/Rx Tables | 5 GHz

Operating Band

Operating Mode

Data Rate

TX Power (conducted)

RX Sensitivity

5 GHz

802.11a

6 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-93 dBm

9 Mb/s

26.0 dBm

-91 dBm

12 Mb/s

24.0 dBm

-89 dBm

18 Mb/s

24.0 dBm

-87 dBm

24 Mb/s

23.0 dBm

-84 dBm

36 Mb/s

23.0 dBm

-81 dBm

48 Mb/s

22.0 dBm

-77 dBm

54 Mb/s

22.0 dBm

-75 dBm

5 GHz

802.11n

(HT20)

MCS0

26.0 dBm

-93 dBm

MCS1

26.0 dBm

-90 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-88 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-82 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-78 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS7

22.0 dBm

-75 dBm

5 GHz

802.11n

(HT40)

MCS0

24.0 dBm

-90 dBm

MCS1

24.0 dBm

-88 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-82 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-79 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-75 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-74 dBm

MCS7

22.0 dBm

-73 dBm

5 GHz

802.11ac

(VHT20)

MCS0

26.0 dBm

-93 dBm

MCS1

26.0 dBm

-90 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-88 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-82 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-78 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS7

22.0 dBm

-75 dBm

MCS8

21.0 dBm

-71 dBM

5 GHz

802.11ac

(VHT40)

MCS0

24.0 dBm

-90 dBm

MCS1

24.0 dBm

-88 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-82 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-79 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-75 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-74 dBm

MCS7

22.0 dBm

-73 dBm

MCS8

20.5 dBm

-69 dBm

MCS9

20.0 dBm

-67 dbm

5 GHz

802.11ac

(VHT80)

MCS0

24.0 dBm

-87 dBm

MCS1

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-82 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-79 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS5

22.0 dBm

-72 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-71 dBm

MCS7

20.0 dBm

-69 dBm

MCS8

19.0 dBm

-65 dBm

MCS9

19.0 dBm

-64 dBm

5 GHz

802.11ax

(HE20)

MCS0

26.0 dBm

-93 dBm

MCS1

26.0 dBm

-91 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-89 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-86 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-83 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-79 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS7

22.0 dBm

-75 dBm

MCS8

21.0 dBm

-72 dBM

MCS9

21.0 dBm

-70 dBm

MCS10

19.0 dBm

-67 dBm

MCS11

19.0 dBm

-67 dBm

5 GHz

802.11ax

(HE40)

MCS0

24.0 dBm

-90 dBm

MCS1

24.0 dBm

-89 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-86 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-83 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-81 dBm

MCS5

23.0 dBm

-76 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-75 dBm

MCS7

21.5 dBm

-73 dBm

MCS8

20.5 dBm

-69 dBm

MCS9

20.0 dBm

-68 dBm

MCS10

18.5 dBm

-64 dBm

MCS11

18.5 dBm

-61 dBm

5 GHz

802.11ax

MCS0

24.0 dBm

-87 dBm

MCS1

24.0 dBm

-85 dBm

MCS2

24.0 dBm

-83 dBm

MCS3

24.0 dBm

-80 dBm

MCS4

24.0 dBm

-77 dBm

MCS5

22.0 dBm

-73 dBm

MCS6

22.0 dBm

-73 dBm

MCS7

20.0 dBm

-70 dBm

MCS8

19.0 dBm

-67 dBm

MCS9

19.0 dBm

-65 dBm

MCS10

17.0 dBm

-61 dBm

MCS11

17.0 dBm

-59 dBm

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